Andrea Steves
artist / curator / producer / organizer

Collaborations
  1. Museum of Capitalism
  2. FICTILIS
  3. Center for Hydrosocial Studies
  4. Double Vision

Publications / News
  1. Museum of Capitalism (Inventory Press)
  2. Double Vision x A Long Wait (Orbis Editions)
  3. A View From the Edge of the Earth (thechart.me)
  4. Monument Lab Podcast -- Museum of Capitalism
  5. Decapitated Economies (K. Verlag)
  6. What Is The Speculative / Roundtable (Sublevel)
  7. Curating "Outside" of the Institution (Exhibitions on the Cusp)
  8. This New Museum Imagines a World Where Capitalism Is Dead (Sarah Burke for Art.sy)
  9. What Would a Museum of Capitalism Look Like? (Anna Wiener for The New Yorker)

Info
  1. About
  2. CV

Upcoming
Nov 19, 2018: Vienna Art Week
Nov 23, 2019: Politics and Heritage Seminar in Oxford
Dec 2018: In residence at Skálar,
 Seyðisfjörður, East Iceland, with Sam Hertz
Jan 16, 2019: Museum Interventions @ 516Arts, Albuquerque
Spring 2019: In residence at the Center For Capitalism Studies / The New School

 
Mark

Double Vision || A Long Wait (Orbis Editions)



Andrea Steves, Francois Hughes, and Yulia Pinkusevich
Edited by Rose Linke
$10.00 // 105 pages, soft cover

 
A Long Wait: Double Vision is an artist book published in conjunction with the 2018 installation developed at Fort Gorges in Portland, Maine by artists Andrea Steves, Francois Hughes, and Yulia Pinkusevich. Edited by Rose Linke, the volume draws on research from the artists' collaborative project, Double Vision, which explores the Cold War history of the Nike Missile Program and its counterparts in the USSR. The project began while the artists were in residence at the Headlands Center for the Arts in the Marin Headlands, California, which is home to the Nike Missile Battery, part of a nationwide nuclear missile defense system active from 1951 to 1972. A Long Wait: Double Vision features photographs, interviews with former Nike veterans and veterans of the USSR’s nuclear programs, and historical documents from multiple archives, allowing for collective reflection on this history and our current reality of heightened nuclear fears.







Mark